Phone scam warning: How fraudsters can target elderly people with worrying phone call | Personal Finance

From online phishing attempts to scammers operating from the door step, there are a whole host of tactics which fraudsters, sadly, use. Now, call blocker makers CPR are urging members of the public to be on alert, as it suggests a US phone scam could be set to hit the UK.

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The company says it could see scammers pretending to be a relative in distress or someone of authority – such as a lawyer or a police officer.

The scam, which has been conning grandparents across the US, sees the “relative” of the grandparent explain that they’re in trouble.

The caller claims they need their “grandparent” to send them funds, insisting they need to be used for a fictitious expense that they need to pay urgently.

Unfortunately, the scammer urges the victim not to tell anyone, even the parent of the “grandchild” – claiming it’s because they don’t want them to find out about the trouble that they’re in.

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Phone scam warning: Man worried in pictures

Phone scam: A warning has been issued by CPR Call Blocker (Image: GETTY)

According to CPR Call Blocker, victims have been tricked out of hundreds or even thousands of pounds.

Chelsea Davies, CPR Call Blocker Business Development Manager, said: “In our experience of working across the US and UK, scams spread quickly across the pond so it is sensible for grandparents to be on their guard as we have no doubt that fraudsters operating in the UK will soon start using these tactics.

“In the meantime, if you suspect you may have compromised your account, contact your bank or card provider as soon as possible.

“It’s also advisable to check your bank and card statements regularly for unauthorised charged as a matter of course.”

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To detect and avoid the so-called “Grandparent Scam”, CPR Call Blocker recommends the following tips:

Beware of any urgent request for money, especially to pay for an unexpected fee such as lawyers feesBefore sending funds, independently contact the relative the scammer is claiming to be (or represent) at a known phone number to verify the detailsof the storyBe aware that scammers carrying out the Grandparent Scam may call late at night to confuse potential victims.

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Phone scam warning: Scammers are purporting to be relatives or authoritative figures, it’s been warned (Image: GETTY)

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To reduce the risk of receiving scam and nuisance calls, CPR Call Blocker has provided a quick three-step guide to stopping unwanted calls:

Sign up to the Telephone Preference Service – call 0845 070 0707 or visit www.tpsonline.org.ukDon’t consent to being contacted – get your phone number taken off directories and look out for tick boxed on all marketing correspondence to see if ticking or unticking them will prevent your details being passed on to third partiesConsider getting a call blocker.

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Recently, Action Fraud has warned about an Amazon Prime scam, which has cost victims more than £1million.

It has seen victims receiving an automated phone call, which then informs them that they have been charged for an Amazon Prime subscription.

They are then told to “press one” in order to cancel the transaction – but this actually directs them to a fraudster who is purporting to be an Amazon customer service representative.

Worryingly, the scammer then tells then that remote access to their device is necessary – which then allows the scammer to monitor the machine and potentially even access online banking details.