State pension age? How you could get extra amount from April 2020 after rise | Personal Finance

This includes Attendance Allowance, which helps with extra costs if an individual has a disability severe enough that they need someone to help to look after them. The payment is paid at two different rates, and it could be claimed if a person needs help with personal support and they’re both physically or mentally disabled, and state pension age or older.

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How much a person gets depends on the level of care that a person needs due to their disability.

The payment does not cover mobility needs, and the individual does not need to have someone caring for them in order to claim.

The weekly rates are dependent on the level of help needed.

Currently, the lower rate is a weekly £58.70, and the level of help needed is defined as “frequent help or constant supervision during the day, or supervision at night”.

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State pension age: Person looking at calculator

State pension age: Attendance Allowance is rising in April, the DWP has confirmed (Image: GETTY)

State pension age: Man looking at finances

State pension age: There are two different Attendance Allowance rates (Image: GETTY)

Should a person need “help or supervision throughout both day and night”, or they’re terminally ill, then it may be that they can get the higher rate of £87.65 per week.

This works out at £3,052.40 across 52 weeks.

Meanwhile, the higher rate equates to £4,557.80 per year.

However, the rates are set to rise in the near future, the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) has confirmed to Express.co.uk.

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Attendance Allowance will increase by 1.7 percent in line with CPI this April.

The higher rate will increase to £89.15 per week – or £4,635.80 across the year.

Meanwhile, the lower rate is a weekly payment of £59.70. Over the course of a 52-week year, this would be £3,104.40.

It has been confirmed that the working-age benefits freeze will come to an end as planned in April.

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State pension age: Attendance Allowance may be claimed by some people (Image: GETTY)

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This means that working-age benefits will rise by 1.7 percent in line with inflation, having stayed at the same level since April 2015.

This includes legacy benefits including Jobseeker’s Allowance, Employment and Support Allowance, Income Support, Housing Benefit, Universal Credit, Child Tax Credits, Working Tax Credits and Child Benefit.

In April, the state pension is also set to rise, with this increase taking place under the triple lock mechanism.

This payment will increase by 3.9 percent, with the rise being tied to wage growth this year.

It will see the full rate of the UK’s new state pension rise to £175.20 per week – meaning an additional £344 per year.

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State pension UK: Dates state pension is paid depend on National Insurance number, Gov.uk states (Image: GETTY)Attendance Allowance: Who is eligible?

A person can claim Attendance Allowance if they have reached state pension age, and the following circumstances apply.

These are:

They have a physical disability (including sensory disability, for example blindness), a mental disability (including learning difficulties), or bothThe disability is severe enough for the person to need help caring for themselves or someone to supervise them, for their own or someone else’s safetyThey have needed that help for at least six months (unless the individual is terminally ill).

Additionally, a person must also:

Be in Great Britain when they claim – there are some exceptions, such as members and family members of the armed forcesHave been in Great Britain for at least two of the last three years (this does not apply if the individual is a refugee or have humanitarian protection status)Be habitually resident in the UK, Ireland, Isle of Man or the Channel IslandsNot be subject to immigration control (unless the individual is a sponsored immigrant).