FTSE 100 risers and fallers: Which shares have gone up today? Which has fallen?

The FTSE twice had its worst day since the 2008 financial crisis in recent weeks. That followed a worldwide trend of financial struggles with several indexes seeing billions wiped off their value as investors sold off shares.

Trending

Which shares have gone up today? Which has fallen?

Thanks to the Bank of England cutting interest rates from 0.75 to 0.25 percent, share prices on the index of Britain’s biggest companies rose.

They up by 124 points, a 2.1 percent increase on the previous day’s trading, to 6,084 at opening on Wednesday morning.

The BoE said the decision to cut rates was because of the spread of COVID-19.

It said its role is to help the country’s businesses and people through the economic crisis caused by the virus.

READ MORE: Savers urged against buying gold to defend against plunging FTSE 100

FTSE 100 risers and fallers: Which shares have gone up today? Which has fallen?

FTSE 100 risers and fallers: Which shares have gone up today? Which has fallen? (Image: Getty)

FTSE 100 risers and fallers: Which shares have gone up today? Which has fallen?

FTSE 100 risers and fallers: The FTSE 100 dropped dramatically last week and has so far failed to recover (Image: FTSE)

READ MORE

ITV’s Robert Peston warns coronavirus FTSE market chaos

The Bank’s move comes on the same day as the Budget.

Neil Wilson, a senior analyst at Markets.com, said the timing of the BoE’s £290bn in extra funding was smart but unlikely to be enough.

Mr Wilson said: “It’s a smart decision to move ahead of the scheduled meeting and do this on Budget day as it maximises the impact of the cut by tying it to the fiscal package.

“Britain is in the best position to respond to the economic impact of the coronavirus. “Heathrow has just said its numbers are down 4.8 percent – the damage is going to be significant and a rate cut is not enough.”

FTSE 100 risers and fallers: Which shares have gone up today? Which has fallen?

FTSE 100 risers and fallers: Other markets, like Japan’s, have also struggled amid the coronavirus epidemic (Image: Getty)

Travel companies have been badly affected by the coronavirus epidemic.

Tourists and travellers have not been booking holidays.

With less demand for European and Asian flights, as well as the cancellation of industry events – which can often help drive investment – stocks in airlines have decreased in value recently.

But today, cruise operator Carnival saw a 4.8 percent increase in its share price.

DON’T MISS:
Why is Bitcoin falling today? Price crash amid coronavirus fears
Dow Jones CRASH: Trading halted as stock market crashes
Coronavirus: Bill Gates’ £2trillion loss prediction revealed 

Related articles

FTSE 100 sheds 230 points in just three hours in coronavirus panic FTSE 100 plummets on worst day since 2008 crash

READ MORE

Saudi oil price war: Why has Saudi Arabia started an oil price war?

British Airways owner IAG has seen a rise in its price on Wednesday morning.

Easyjet, which saw its value fall by 27 percent last week, has not seen a lot of movement so far today.

The biggest mover on Wednesday is Legal & General, up 4.5 percent.

ITV has also seen an increase, going up by 4.24 percent.

FTSE 100 risers and fallers: Which shares have gone up today? Which has fallen?

FTSE 100 risers and fallers: The Bank of England’s interest rate cut helped stocks on Wednesday (Image: Getty)

The index’s housebuilders appear to have been boosted by the BoE’s announcement.

Lower interest rates tend to help boost the housing market.

That has helped Persimmon, Taylor Wimpey and Barratt increase their share price between 3.6 and 4.2 percent early on Wednesday.

Additional help from high street banks like RBS and NatWest – who have suspended mortgage payments for people affected by COVID-19 – seems to have further stabilised the housing market.

Related articles

Coronavirus: How many have died from COVID-19? How many infected? FTSE 100 share price plunges as coronavirus hits Canary Wharf What is happening to the stock market amid COVID-19 fears?

Last week the UK’s stock market, the FTSE 100, had its worst week since the 2008 financial crash.

Over the course of five days, about £210bn was wiped off the value of the UK’s biggest businesses, with the blue-chip index falling 13 percent.

When a new disease starts to spread across the world, investors can become twitchy because there is the potential to disrupt supply chains, shut down factories, stop consumers from spending their money, so they sell shares.

But despite episodes of volatility – like the SARS outbreak in 2002 – stocks, in general, go up over time, however, every instant is different and the past does not guarantee how the future will play out.